Episode 6: Still More Colleges with Special Emphases (Part 3)

We’re continuing our series on understanding the world of college this week by exploring faith-based colleges and universities, and institutions for students with special needs. Complete show notes to this episode, with links to all the colleges we mention, are available at http://usacollegechat.org/6.

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Why people think a Jesuit education is so great
What to do for your child with special needs before he or she leaves high school
The job of student support services personnel at colleges and universities

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We’re continuing our series on understanding the world of college this week by exploring faith-based colleges and universities, and institutions for students with special needs.

NYCollegeChat Episode 6 Still More Colleges with Special Emphases (Part 3)

NYCollegeChat is now available on iTunes, Spreaker, Stitcher, and TuneIn!

1. Faith-Based Colleges and Universities

Faith-based, or religious, colleges and universities are a broader category than you might think. They range from hundreds of small Bible colleges, which are dedicated to religious life and religion study, to very large universities that offer all fields of study, though with an underlying religious or moral or service-to-others orientation, like the University of Notre Dame. In addition, of course, are theological seminaries, which are designed mainly for individuals wishing to become ministers and are typically graduate schools.

Some faith-based institutions require more theology or religion or Bible study than others. Some require students to attend chapel services; some do not. Consequently, students who are not of the same faith as the college’s founding church will be more or less comfortable attending them. Interestingly, many colleges and universities have actually been founded by religious denominations, some of which retain their denomination affiliation and some of which do not.

Some faith-based institutions are Catholic, some Jewish, and some Protestant (including African Methodist Episcopal, Baptist, Presbyterian, Methodist, Lutheran, and more). Perhaps the two best-known Jewish universities in the U.S. are here in the Northeast: Yeshiva University in New York City, which combines an academic and religious education, and Brandeis University located outside Boston, which is a nonsectarian Jewish-supported institution.

The world of some 200 Catholic colleges and universities in the U.S. is complicated by the fact that they have been founded by various orders (like the Jesuits, Dominicans, Lasallians, and Franciscans) and by other groups within the Catholic community. Well-known and respected Catholic institutions include University of Notre Dame, Georgetown University, Boston College, Fordham University here in New York City, Villanova University, and the College of the Holy Cross and some that do not sound as though they are Catholic, like the University of Dallas, Manhattan College, Saint Louis University, Santa Clara University, and the University of San Diego.

The list of colleges affiliated with or founded by Protestant denominations is very, very long. If you are interested, you can easily find them online by looking up “Methodist colleges,” “Presbyterian colleges,” and so on. Some are associated with a denomination mainly through historical traditions, and others are more actively affiliated today. To find out how influential religion is in everyday life at a college, you will need to read about the college’s academic offerings and student life online or better still, call and ask. For example, Baylor University describes itself online as “a private Christian university and a nationally ranked research institution,” which was “chartered in 1845 by the Republic of Texas through the efforts of Baptist pioneers.” On the other hand, American University, Southern Methodist University, and Duke University had early Methodist affiliations, but they are not considered faith-based today.

2. Colleges and Universities for Students with Special Needs

While students with special needs can succeed at a wide variety of colleges and universities and while there are colleges and universities that have special programs for those students, there are also some that are dedicated to serving students with special needs.

Gallaudet University in Washington, D.C., was established as a college by an Act of Congress in 1864 to serve deaf and hard-of-hearing students. It was then and still is the world’s only such institution. The President of the United States signed the first diplomas of graduates in 1869, a tradition that continues to this day. Interestingly, up to 5 percent of the seats in each incoming class are open to hearing students. Gallaudet’s more than 1,700 students are pursuing both undergraduate and graduate degrees in what Gallaudet itself describes as a “bilingual, diverse, multicultural institution.” As an added bonus, its tuition is remarkably reasonable at about $14,000 a year because it is actually a public college.

In upstate New York at the Rochester Institute of Technology, students can find the National Technical Institute for the Deaf, one of nine colleges of RIT. Established by an Act of Congress in 1965, NTID is the world’s first and largest technological college for students who are deaf or hard of hearing. NTID offers career-oriented associate’s degrees in technical fields and associate’s degrees that lead directly into bachelor’s degrees study at RIT’s other colleges. It also offers the support services that deaf and hard-of-hearing students would need to study in the other RIT colleges. Because it is a public college, even though it is within a private university, the tuition is quite reasonable.

Let’s look at Landmark College in Vermont, founded in 1985 to help students with dyslexia succeed in college. Offering several associate’s degrees and a Bachelor of Arts in Liberal Studies, Landmark now serves a variety of students who learn differently—that is, students with learning disabilities, autism spectrum disorder, and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. The College provides an impressive array of academic and personal support services to help Landmark students cope with college courses and college life. Summer programs are also available to rising high school juniors and seniors who learn differently and could benefit from Landmark’s approach.

Listen to the podcast to find out about…

  • Why people think a Jesuit education is so great
  • What to do for your child with special needs before he or she leaves high school
  • The job of student support services personnel at colleges and universities

Check out these higher education institutions we mention…

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Episode 5: Colleges with Special Emphases (Part 2)

We’re continuing our series on understanding the world of college this week by exploring colleges and universities with selected academic specialties.

Regardless of the wide range of subjects most students study in high school, for some students one particular subject is the only reason to come to school. That is one reason that it is so important for high schools to offer a full array of subjects and a broad schedule of after-school activities.

Some students are ready to specialize when it comes to college. What those students have to decide is whether to attend a university—which offers the field of study they are interested in, along with many, many others—or a college that is entirely dedicated to the field of study they are interested in.

Listen to the podcast to find out about…
What parents, teachers, and high school students want from arts education
The truth about taking courses across schools or colleges within a university
The surprising breadth of courses in colleges devoted to the arts

Connect with us through…
Subscribing to NYCollegeChat on iTunes, Spreaker, Stitcher, or TuneIn!
Following us on Twitter @NYCollegeChat
Reviewing parent materials we have available at Policy Studies in Education
Inquiring about our consulting services if you need individualized help
Following us on Facebook as NYCollegeChat

Ask your questions or share your feedback by…
Calling our hotline at 516-900-NYCC
Emailing us at paul@policystudies.org to ask a question if you want us to answer it privately

We’re continuing our series on understanding the world of college this week by exploring colleges and universities with selected academic specialties.

NYCollegeChat Episode 5 Colleges with Special Emphases Part 2NYCollegeChat is now available on iTunes, Spreaker, Stitcher, and TuneIn!

Colleges and Universities with Selected Academic Specialties

Regardless of the wide range of subjects most students study in high school, for some students one particular subject is the only reason to come to school. That is one reason that it is so important for high schools to offer a full array of subjects and a broad schedule of after-school activities.

Some students are ready to specialize when it comes to college. What those students have to decide is whether to attend a university—which offers the field of study they are interested in, along with many, many others—or a college that is entirely dedicated to the field of study they are interested in. As we said in an earlier episode, a university typically has separate colleges or schools within it, each of which focuses on a broad field of study—for example, within the State University of New York at New Paltz, undergraduates can attend the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, the School of Business, the School of Education, the School of Fine and Performing Arts, or the School of Science and Engineering. (Learn more about two-year colleges, four-year colleges, and universities in this episode of the podcast.)

What are the pros and cons of choosing a university or an independent dedicated college? On one hand, a student who ends up wanting to change to a different field of study might have an easier time doing so in a university setting, where that student could end up in an entirely different part of the university. On the other hand, a student who does really well in one field and does not want to spend time studying others might progress quicker, learn more in depth, and be better focused in a college dedicated to that field.

So let’s look at the arts first. Students who are passionate about the arts have quite a number of well-regarded choices. Some schools devoted to the arts are within larger institutions, including the Eastman School of Music at the University of Rochester, the Tisch School of the Arts at New York University, the Conservatory of Music at Oberlin College, the Meadows School of the Arts at Southern Methodist University, and the Jacobs School of Music at Indiana University.

Turning to institutions wholly dedicated to the arts, there is the highly selective Juilliard School here in New York City, well known for its degrees in drama, music, and dance. The School of the Art Institute of Chicago, associated with the famous art museum of the same name, offers degrees in studio art, but also in art history and art education as well as other arts-related specialties. Founded in 1887, Pratt Institute in New York City offers both undergraduate and graduate degrees, with 22 associate’s and bachelor’s degrees in the arts and arts-related fields, including degrees in architecture, graphic design, painting and drawing, illustration, film, photography, digital arts, fashion, interior design, and art history. Rhode Island School of Design offers 15 Bachelors of Fine Arts majors in visual arts and design specialties and a Bachelor of Architecture degree.

Berklee College of Music in Boston, which is dedicated to the study of music, is a bit different from most other music schools because it draws students from around the world to study contemporary, rather than classical, music and offers degrees in a wide range of music specialties, including performance, composition, film scoring, music therapy, music education, production and engineering, and music business. Berklee’s new graduate campus in Valencia, Spain—again, dedicated to the study of music—offers its master’s degrees programs in extraordinary facilities, designed by modern architect Santiago Calatrava, in a setting that showcases global music.

Students who are intrigued by the rigorous technical field of engineering might consider a school of engineering within a large university (many big public universities have them and quite a few private universities also have them), like the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, California Institute of Technology, the University of Texas, Texas A & M University, the University of Illinois, the University of Southern California, Carnegie Mellon University, Cornell University, Columbia University, and many more. But, some smaller colleges have engineering programs as well. Take the example of Manhattan College (in New York City), which has 3,500 students, but offers a School of Engineering with both undergraduate and graduate degrees. Or these students might consider an institution that is dedicated to the study of engineering, like the Milwaukee School of Engineering.

Students who have decided that business is their future can attend business schools that can be found at many public and private universities—some well-known for their undergraduate business schools and some for their graduate business schools—including the University of Pennsylvania, Harvard University, the University of Chicago, Stanford University, New York University, Northwestern University, the University of California at Berkeley, the University of Virginia, and many more. Stand-alone institutions dedicated to the study of business are the other way to go. Students could consider places like Babson College and Bentley University, both private colleges located in Massachusetts.

The two options—a school or college within a larger university vs. a stand-alone college dedicated to one academic field—and these examples will give you some background for thinking about college options when a student is truly interested in one field of study.

Listen to the podcast to find out about…

  • What parents, teachers, and high school students want from arts education
  • The truth about taking courses across schools or colleges within a university
  • The surprising breadth of courses in colleges devoted to the arts

Check out these higher education institutions we mention…

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Episode 4: Colleges with Special Emphases (Part 1)

This episode is part of our series on understanding the world of college. We focus on four types of institutions with special emphases: historically black colleges and universities, single-sex colleges and universities, military service academies, and colleges offering online study.

For more details and show notes, visit http://usacollegechat.org/4.

Connect with us on Twitter @NYCollegeChat, Facebook at www.facebook.com/NYCollegeChat, or by calling our hotline at 516-900-NYCC.

This episode is part of our series on understanding the world of college. We focus on five types of institutions with special emphases: historically black colleges and universities, Hispanic-serving institutions, single-sex colleges and universities, military service academies, and colleges offering online study.

NYCollegeChat episode 4 show notes1. Historically Black Colleges and Universities

Commonly referred to as HBCUs, these colleges and universities share a mission of educating African-American students solely or primarily. The just over 100 HBCUs can be found in many states and in both rural and urban areas. They are large and small, two-year and four-year colleges, some with graduate schools. Some offer liberal arts degrees, and some offer technical degrees.

Some were founded in the late 1800s, shortly after the Civil War. They share a proud tradition of becoming the first collegiate homes of family members of freed slaves.

Some have produced great African-American leaders, like Thurgood Marshall who attended Lincoln University and Howard University School of Law. Some have put great African-American leaders from all walks of life on their payrolls as professors and administrators, like Fisk University where Harlem Renaissance figures Charles Spurgeon Johnson (its first black president), Arna Bontemps, Aaron Douglas, James Weldon Johnson, and others all worked.

2. Hispanic-Serving Institutions

Hispanic-Serving Institutions (HSIs) are colleges and universities where total Hispanic enrollment is a minimum of 25 percent of the student body.  There are almost 250 HSIs in the U.S. today, representing 15 states plus Puerto Rico.

While these institutions do not have the long history that HBCUs do, Hispanic/Latino students might be interested in attending a college or university where they can find a large community with a common cultural background.  There are 11 HSIs right here in New York State, including seven campuses of the City University of New York, with far more institutions in California and Texas, which have larger Hispanic populations.

3. Single-Sex Colleges and Universities

Colleges and universities that were started in America’s earliest days were all institutions for men. They were all single-sex institutions then.

Seven of the eight well-known Ivy League institutions served only male students when they were founded in the 1600s and 1700s: the University of Pennsylvania, Columbia, Dartmouth, Brown, Princeton, Harvard, and Yale. Among the Ivies, only Cornell, the youngest of the Ivies, was founded as a co-educational university, which took as its mission to enroll both men and women from its first day.

As time went on, most of the Ivies had a “sister” school for women: the University of Pennsylvania had a College for Women, Columbia had Barnard, Brown had Pembroke, and Harvard had Radcliffe. Of these, only Barnard remains.

While most single-sex institutions have opened their doors to the opposite sex over the years, some do remain and carry on a tradition that their graduates wholeheartedly support.

4. Military Service Academies

The five well-respected military service academies train officers for the military and provide an excellent collegiate education in selected academic fields as well: the United States Naval Academy (often referred to as Annapolis), the United States Military Academy (commonly referred to as West Point), the Air Force Academy, the United States Coast Guard Academy, and the United States Merchant Marine Academy.

Admission to the service academies is highly selective. While there is no tuition, there is a service obligation of a number of years upon graduation. In turbulent times worldwide, that service obligation is something for families to consider carefully.

5. Colleges Offering Online Study

Online study is becoming increasingly popular, with complete degrees now being offered through online study, especially at the graduate level. Even if a fully online degree is not attractive, many courses are now offered partly (“hybrid courses”) or completely online so that students do not have to attend as many or any classes on the campus.

For some students, an online course or even an online degree can be very useful and can enable students to earn credits when they cannot travel to a college campus. But online courses require a lot of self-discipline, which makes it difficult for some students to do well.

Online courses are not easier than regular courses. They require just as much work from students, probably with less guidance from the professor. Students enrolling in online courses need to know what will be expected of them and need to think hard about whether they have the motivation needed to succeed.

Listen to the podcast to find out about…

  • The value of the support students get at HBCUs and single-sex colleges
  • Find out about the 11 Hispanic-serving institutions in New York State
  • Why Barnard College? Why Wabash College? Why Paul Quinn College?
  • What tradition has to do with it
  • The pitfalls of online study, from the perspective of the professor

Check out these higher education institutions we mention…

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Episode 3: Liberal Arts Study and Technical Study

This episode is part of our series on understanding the world of college. In this episode, we talk about the difference between liberal arts study and technical study.

For detailed show notes including links to all the colleges mentioned in this episode, visit http://usacollegechat.org/3.

NYCollege Chat is a weekly podcast for parents and high school students about the world of college brought to you by Policy Studies in Education.

Connect with us! Follow us on Facebook or Twitter as NYCollegeChat. Contact us with questions at 516-900-NYCC.

This episode is part of our series on understanding the world of college and is focused on the difference between liberal arts study and technical study.

NYCollegeChat Episode 3 Liberal Arts Study and Technical Study

1. Liberal Arts Study Defined

A study of the liberal arts means that students study a variety of academic subjects, typically including literature, history, mathematics, fine arts, philosophy, biological or physical sciences, foreign languages, and the social sciences, like psychology or sociology. Sometimes these subjects as a group are called the “arts and sciences” or “humanities and sciences.”

A “liberal arts college” usually refers to a relatively small, private four-year college, where a student studies a variety of courses in the liberal arts and chooses to major in one of them.

2. Technical Study Defined

Technical study usually focuses on one or more specific career fields, such as engineering, computer studies, construction trades, fashion design, and more. Technical study can be done at proprietary colleges, two-year colleges, four-year colleges, or universities. Two of our nation’s best universities specialize in technical study—Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Caltech (California Institute of Technology).

A “technical college” usually refers to a two-year college that offers associate’s degrees in specific career fields. Some technical colleges require students to take some liberal arts courses in their first year or two of study; others do not. Some technical colleges even offer a two-year degree in liberal arts—undoubtedly because some students just have not made a career decision yet.

3. Choosing Liberal Arts or Technical Study

Some people believe that all students should start out in the liberal arts so that they have a well-rounded education and so that they can sample many fields of study—including those that are not available to most high school students—before settling in on one.

Some people believe that students who are set on a specific career field when they leave high school should be able to pursue it immediately in college and thus move onto that career path faster.

Keep in mind that either liberal arts study or technical study can be pursued at two-year and four-year, public and private institutions, depending on a student’s circumstances. So a student has to make two important decisions: both the right institution and the right course of study.

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Episode 2: Two-Year Colleges, Four-Year Colleges, and Universities

This episode is part of our series on understanding the world of college. In this episode, we talk about the differences among two-year colleges, four-year colleges, and universities.

For detailed show notes including links to all the colleges mentioned in this episode, visit http://usacollegechat.org/2.

NYCollege Chat is a weekly podcast for parents and high school students about the world of college brought to you by Policy Studies in Education.

Connect with us! Follow us on Facebook or Twitter as NYCollegeChat. Contact us with questions at 516-900-NYCC.

This episode is part of our series on understanding the world of college and is focused on the differences among two-year colleges, four-year colleges, and universities.

NYCollegeChat Episode 2 - Two-Year Colleges, Four-Year Colleges, and Universities1. Types of Two-Year Colleges

There are over 1,100 two-year colleges in the U.S., with almost 1,000 of them being public colleges, usually referred to as “community colleges.” Some two-year colleges might still carry the name of “junior college,” which was more popular 100 years ago. Today, some two-year colleges have dropped the word “junior” or “community” from their names altogether, such as Montgomery College in Montgomery County, Maryland.

2. Costs at Two-Year Colleges

As tuition increases across the U.S., more and more students are considering attending a public two-year college first—before transferring to a four-year college to finish a degree. Because two-year colleges have lower tuition rates than four-year colleges, this strategy saves family money for use later at a more expensive public or private four-year college.

Just like public four-year colleges, public two-year colleges can be funded by local (city or county) governments and state governments.

3. Students at Two-Year Colleges

Although more and more students are choosing two-year colleges as their first college step, the average age of two-year college students is in the mid-twenties. That is because many adults returning to college also choose two-year colleges.

So the atmosphere in classes can be a bit more serious than an 18-year-old’s recent high school classes. Plus, most two-year colleges are commuter colleges; students do not live on campus in dorms, but rather commute to classes from their homes. That can make the atmosphere on campus different from a traditional four-year college.

4. Degrees Awarded by Two-Year Colleges and by Four-Year Colleges/Universities

Two-year colleges award associate’s degrees for two years’ worth of completed courses, usually totaling about 60 credits. Students can study part time at a two-year college and take three, four, or even more years to complete those credits and earn an associate’s degree.

Only four-year colleges and universities can award bachelor’s degrees. A bachelor’s degree indicates a higher level of college study, which is preferred by many employers and which is required by universities if a student wants to pursue a graduate or professional degree, like a master’s degree or a doctoral degree in any field of study.

5. Transferring to Four-Year Colleges/Universities

Credits earned at a two-year college can be transferred to a four-year college or university. But some four-year colleges and universities will not accept all of the credits that were earned at a two-year college. (Some will not accept all of the credits that were earned at another four-year college or university, either.)

The best way to make sure that all two-year college credits transfer is to earn an associate’s degree. A four-year college or university will accept an associate’s degree (and all the credits that went into it) from a transfer student.

6. Universities Defined

A university is usually a larger institution with more students and more professors than a two-year college or a four-year college. A university offers both undergraduate and graduate degrees. Undergraduate degrees are associate’s and bachelor’s degrees; graduate degrees are master’s and doctoral degrees.

A large university typically is made up of more than one “school” or “college,” which are focused on different fields of study.   One of these components usually focuses on the liberal arts (more about that in Episode 3); others might focus on education, engineering, fine arts, business, health sciences, or other subject fields.

Universities usually award different types of four-year bachelor’s degrees, depending on a student’s major field of study, such as a Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Science, Bachelor of Fine Arts, Bachelor of Architecture, Bachelor of Business Administration, and more. Some universities offer two-year associate’s degrees as well.

Sometimes the schools or colleges within a university are only for graduate students who have already earned a bachelor’s degree. Graduate students might attend a university’s medical school, law school, school of theology, journalism school, or others. A university awards master’s degrees and sometimes doctoral degrees to graduate students.

Listen to the podcast to find out about…

  • The pitfalls of trying to transfer college credits
  • Universities as research institutions
  • The pros and cons of large universities and small colleges

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