Episode 12: To Visit Or Not To Visit?

This week, we’re continuing our series on choosing where your child should apply to college by talking about campus visits.

Listen to the podcast to find out about…
When your teenager should visit a college without you
How to take advantage of financial help from colleges to cover travel costs
How to arrange a weekend visit to a college for your teenager

Episode show notes are available at http://usacollegechat.org/12

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Subscribing to NYCollegeChat on iTunes, Spreaker, Stitcher, or TuneIn!
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Calling our hotline at 516-900-NYCC
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This week, we’re continuing our series on choosing where your child should apply to college by talking about how many colleges should be added to your list.

NYCollegeChat is now available on iTunes, Spreaker, Stitcher, and TuneIn!

NYCollegeChat Episode 12: To Visit or Not to Visit? - How important is the campus visit?For many decades, one rite of passage for American high schoolers and their parents alike has been the “college tour,” where a parent takes an anxious or blasé teenager (depending on your child) on a tour of colleges that might or might not turn out to be appealing schools to attend. During these college visits, there are campus tours led by college students, question-and-answer sessions with administrators, sometimes a chance to sit in on a class or two, and perhaps the nerve-wracking one-on-one admissions interview.

So, as you and your teenager enter the college applications process, let’s ask this question: How important are college visits? You will actually hear, in our three options, that the answer is always “very important.” Just the when or how those visits occur is what we are going to talk about.

1. Very Important, So Visit Now . . .

. . . because there is no substitute for standing in the main quadrangle or in a classroom building or in a dorm or on the soccer field or on the library steps. It is impossible to convey the feeling of a college’s physical and social and intellectual environment without being there. Why would anyone want to sign up to spend two years or four years at a place that he or she had never seen? By the way, this is true for students who are living on campus and who are living off campus. Your teenager will spend a lot of time at the college—regardless of living in the dorms—and should want to get a feeling for its buildings and its grounds and its setting within its surroundings and, of course, its students, staff, and faculty.

Visiting colleges before applying to them makes a lot of sense because even all colleges of a certain type are not the same. In other words, you cannot visit one or two private four-year colleges and, based on them, know what private four-year colleges are like. You cannot visit one or two public community colleges and, based on them, know what public community colleges are like. You cannot visit one or two urban campuses (or urban colleges with barely any “campus”) and, based on them, know what urban colleges are like.

Visiting a college before applying might convince your teenager not to apply, thus saving you that time and effort and money. But, visiting colleges is not free—especially when they are not in your hometown. Many families cannot afford to take the time off or spend the travel money that it takes to make a college swing through several states—or even through your own state, if it is as large as New York, where you cannot make an inexpensive day trip from one end to the other.

On the other hand, if you have decided to limit your applications to colleges in your hometown or very close by, then you absolutely should visit before applying. Make sure you take a tour of the campus, that you talk with current students, and that you sit in on a class or two, if possible. There is no reason to miss out on this chance to find out what everyday life is like on that campus and how different it might feel from another college campus that could be just minutes away. For example, if you live in New York City and want to stay in New York City for college, you would find out how different the campuses of just these four-year colleges were if you were to visit them: New York University and The New School in Greenwich Village, Columbia University and Barnard College in Morningside Heights, Fordham University at Lincoln Center, Hunter College in midtown, Pace University in downtown—and we have not left Manhattan yet. All of these schools are just a subway ride away for New Yorkers.

2. Very Important, But Visit Later . . .

. . . after acceptances have been received and your teenager is trying to decide which college to attend. After all, it is cheaper to pay the application fee for a college than to spend the money to visit it ahead of time (unless it is in your hometown).

If your teenager is accepted at more than one college, perhaps that is soon enough to spend the time and money to visit those colleges if you are trying to decide among them. It might be that visiting your teenager’s first choice is all that is needed—if the visit is successful and confirms that that college is indeed the right one. Nothing is more cost-effective than that.

3. Very Important, But Visiting Is Not an Option

Sometimes it is just not possible for a family to arrange for a campus visit to several colleges or even to one college, even after acceptances have come in.

In that case, you all can—and should—talk to anyone you can find who has visited any college on your list as a kind of substitute for making the trip yourself. That might be a family friend, a high school friend, a teacher, a school administrator, a guidance counselor, or someone else. Some colleges use alumni interviewers, who could serve this function nicely, too.

Firsthand impressions from someone who has walked on the campus in different seasons of the year, has seen inside the dorms, has talked with faculty or visited a class, has talked with current students or recent graduates, has eaten in the cafeteria, has attended a sports event or a cultural event—all of these impressions can help your teenager make a better decision about where to enroll. Ideally, at least some of those substitutes would be individuals who had been on the campus recently—and preferably someone with a more in-depth feel for the college than one can get from simply walking across the campus. A current professor or current student or recent graduate would be a great choice.

Remember that it is not only about the physical surroundings, but also about the intellectual and social surroundings, which the casual visitor might not be able to pick up on so readily. Photographs in a brochure or on a website or even a virtual campus tour on a website might resolve your questions about the physical surroundings, but cannot answer your questions about the intellectual and social surroundings, which are more likely to affect your satisfaction with your college choice.

Listen to the podcast to find out about…

  • When your teenager should visit a college without you
  • How to take advantage of financial help from colleges to cover travel costs
  • How to arrange a weekend visit to a college for your teenager

Check out these higher education institutions and programs we mention…

In New York State

Outside of New York State

Connect with us through…

Ask your questions or share your feedback by…

Episode 3: Liberal Arts Study and Technical Study

This episode is part of our series on understanding the world of college. In this episode, we talk about the difference between liberal arts study and technical study.

For detailed show notes including links to all the colleges mentioned in this episode, visit http://usacollegechat.org/3.

NYCollege Chat is a weekly podcast for parents and high school students about the world of college brought to you by Policy Studies in Education.

Connect with us! Follow us on Facebook or Twitter as NYCollegeChat. Contact us with questions at 516-900-NYCC.

This episode is part of our series on understanding the world of college and is focused on the difference between liberal arts study and technical study.

NYCollegeChat Episode 3 Liberal Arts Study and Technical Study

1. Liberal Arts Study Defined

A study of the liberal arts means that students study a variety of academic subjects, typically including literature, history, mathematics, fine arts, philosophy, biological or physical sciences, foreign languages, and the social sciences, like psychology or sociology. Sometimes these subjects as a group are called the “arts and sciences” or “humanities and sciences.”

A “liberal arts college” usually refers to a relatively small, private four-year college, where a student studies a variety of courses in the liberal arts and chooses to major in one of them.

2. Technical Study Defined

Technical study usually focuses on one or more specific career fields, such as engineering, computer studies, construction trades, fashion design, and more. Technical study can be done at proprietary colleges, two-year colleges, four-year colleges, or universities. Two of our nation’s best universities specialize in technical study—Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Caltech (California Institute of Technology).

A “technical college” usually refers to a two-year college that offers associate’s degrees in specific career fields. Some technical colleges require students to take some liberal arts courses in their first year or two of study; others do not. Some technical colleges even offer a two-year degree in liberal arts—undoubtedly because some students just have not made a career decision yet.

3. Choosing Liberal Arts or Technical Study

Some people believe that all students should start out in the liberal arts so that they have a well-rounded education and so that they can sample many fields of study—including those that are not available to most high school students—before settling in on one.

Some people believe that students who are set on a specific career field when they leave high school should be able to pursue it immediately in college and thus move onto that career path faster.

Keep in mind that either liberal arts study or technical study can be pursued at two-year and four-year, public and private institutions, depending on a student’s circumstances. So a student has to make two important decisions: both the right institution and the right course of study.

Listen to the podcast to find out about…

Check out these higher education institutions we mention…

In New York State

Outside of New York State

Connect with us through…

  • Following us on Twitter @NYCollegeChat
  • Reviewing parent materials we have available at Policy Studies in Education
  • Inquiring about our consulting services if you need individualized help
  • Following us on Facebook

Ask your questions or share your feedback by…