Episode 122: A Truly American International University

Listen to the episode in the player, download it here, or subscribe on iTunes, Stitcher, or TuneIn.

Before we start today’s episode, which will take us abroad, let us remind you to rush out right now and get our new book if you have a junior at home (and even if you have a freshman or sophomore). That’s “rush out right now” figuratively speaking, because the book is available at amazon.com, so there is no need to leave home to get it. But why now? Because using the book is a perfect way for your teenager to spend some time this summer–that is, researching colleges of interest to him or her and/or colleges of interest to you for him or her!

In case you missed our recent episodes, the book is How To Explore Your College Options: A Workbook for High School Students. And, as we have said before, it is a WORKbook. It makes the point that many of us learned the hard way: that is, it takes a lot of work to figure out the best colleges for your teenager to apply to. And, as some parents we have worked with recently can tell you, deciding where to apply is probably more important than deciding where to enroll. If your teenager (with your help) chooses colleges to apply to wisely and with enthusiasm, then the choice of where to enroll ends up being a lot happier and easier to make.

But back to our current series, Colleges in the Spotlight. As many of our regular listeners know, I spent last week in London attending my daughter’s graduation from her master’s degree program. My son had previously attended the same university for his bachelor’s degree, and I was looking forward to doing the graduation ceremony a second time. It is not surprising, I guess, that the alma mater of two of my kids would become today’s episode. That’s not because, by the way, it is the alma mater of two of my kids, but rather because it is a university–or one of a group of similar universities–that just might persuade some of you to leave your geographic comfort zone.

1. Spotlight on Richmond

At the beginning of our new book, we ask students to expand their college options by investigating all geographic regions of the U.S. and putting together their own personal long list of college options (or LLCO). Then, we go one step further and ask students to make sure that they have at least one college that is not in the U.S. on their LLCO. In the book, we talk to students about studying outside the U.S.:

This is a favorite topic of ours, and we can’t say enough about it. There are truly great options outside the U.S. We hope that every one of you will take advantage of studying abroad for at least a semester, no matter where you end up in college. Studying abroad is for everyone these days–not just for rich kids, not just for kids studying foreign languages, not just for kids at private liberal arts colleges. But you can actually study outside the U.S. for more than a semester or even for more than one year; you can simply go to a college outside the U.S. full time for four years.

You might want to check out one of our favorite options: Richmond, The American International University in London. Jointly accredited in the U.S. and the U.K., it is a one-of-a-kind institution. It offers students four-year bachelor’s degrees–first, on an idyllic campus in Richmond-upon-Thames (just outside London) for freshmen and sophomores and, then, on an ideal Kensington campus in the heart of London for juniors and seniors. We have seen Richmond up close for a decade and still love it. (P.S. Richmond offers master’s degrees, too, if you’d rather wait for your study abroad experience.) The global future is here, kids. Join it.

Well, that could not be more true. There are plenty of universities to choose from outside the U.S., but let me talk to you a bit today about Richmond, the American International University in London because it is the one that I know the best. I have known its students; I have known its professors (with whom I have been very impressed); I have known its staff members. I have seen it as the parent of an undergraduate student for four years and as the parent of a graduate student for a little over a year.

I have seen what being an international university is all about. At the graduation ceremony last week, after the Master of Arts and Master of Business Administration students were presented with diplomas, we had the roll call of undergraduate students. There were about 180 undergraduate candidates for Bachelor of Arts degrees–and they represented 42 countries.

Now, when we did our virtual nationwide tour of colleges (way back in Episodes 27 through 53), we often commented on the number of foreign countries that U.S. colleges claimed they drew students from. Some colleges–especially large universities–were fond of saying that they drew students from 100 foreign countries, and we always thought that was great. But those colleges typically had thousands of students, so I am not sure how international each class students sat in actually seemed to the students.

At Richmond, 42 countries were represented in just 180 college seniors. Every class students sat in was international–just like every dorm hallway and every group of students just hanging out and chatting. I remember well how international my son’s group of friends really was. This year, about 63 graduating seniors at Richmond came from the U.S., about 41 from the U.K., and the remaining 78 from the following countries: 9 from Spain, 7 from Italy, 7 from Bulgaria, 6 from France, 5 from Germany, 4 from Sweden, 4 from Lebanon, 4 from Belgium, 3 from Nigeria, 2 each from Brazil and Norway, and 1 each from Kuwait, Cameroon, Estonia, Guam, the Dominican Republic, Hungary, the Netherlands, Romania, Libya, Bahrain, Greece, Albania, Jordan, Portugal, India, Zambia, Pakistan, Kenya, Cyprus, Finland, Montenegro, the Republic of Kosovo, Egypt, Malaysia, the Czech Republic, Turkey, Saudi Arabia, Canada, and Australia.

Wow. It was amazing to see all the kids and to see the very obvious cross-cultural bonds that had been forged, but it was also amazing to see all of the families and to hear all of the languages being spoken by the proud families of the graduates. It left no doubt in my mind about the value of the truly international experience that these kids had enjoyed.

For the record, Richmond is dually accredited in both the U.S. and the U.K. Richmond describes itself as a liberal arts university, and we have talked about the merits of liberal arts study frequently here at USACollegeChat. In fact, one of the speakers at graduation last week spoke about the liberal arts tradition at Richmond and its significance. Richmond prizes what it believes to be the result of a liberal arts education: namely, students who can think critically and creatively and who can make connections among a broad range of subjects they have studied.

In our new book, one of the topics we call on high school students to investigate when exploring their college options is the presence of a core curriculum. As we have said before, some colleges have quite an extensive required core curriculum, including specific required courses; some colleges have a less specific required core curriculum, including a choice of courses in specified, but broad, fields of study (like the humanities); and some colleges have no required core curriculum at all. Depending on what you or your teenager wants, having a core curriculum can be either a positive or a negative in a college you are considering.

Richmond, in fact, has a sort of mixed core curriculum consisting of 10 three-credit courses taken in the freshman year. Its core curriculum includes some specific courses like Research and Writing I and II, Creative Expression, Scientific Reasoning, and Transitions: London Calling I and II (which focuses on service learning and answers the question, “How can you use London, with all its attractions and all its problems, to help others whilst helping yourself?”) But, less restrictively, the core curriculum also includes a Quantitative Reasoning course (which depends on the student’s major), the student’s choice of any one of 17 Humanities and Social Science course options, and two additional courses of the student’s own choosing outside the major. So, the core is there–with a little wiggle room. Frankly, I am glad as a parent that it was there because I am quite sure that my son would have otherwise avoided quantitative reasoning at all costs.

And let me mention one more very attractive feature of Richmond’s undergraduate program, and this is something else we suggest that students look for when exploring their college options. It is Richmond’s far-reaching study abroad programs, which are available through partnerships in Europe, North and South America, the South Pacific, Asia, South East Asia and the Middle East, but also through Richmond’s own mini-campuses in Rome and Florence. My son did a summer at the Rome campus as a high school student, and both my son and daughter did a semester at the Florence campus during their undergraduate study. (By the way, your college student can study at Richmond’s Florence campus through the American Institute for Foreign Study from whatever college he or she chooses in the U.S. My daughter Polly went there for a semester from Fordham University.)

Richmond’s Florence program is outstanding in many ways, including for the variety of art and art history courses that are offered and for the Italian language classes that are offered. Students can earn a full year of language credit in just one semester because of the required one-week full-time Italian course that students take prior to the beginning of the actual semester, followed by a second Italian course at the appropriate level during the semester.

Finally, I just learned that Richmond now offers a full freshman year at the Florence campus. I am sorry I don’t have any children left to send! What could be better than a year in Florence, a year in Richmond-upon-Thames, and two years in London? That’s a truly international university, as I might have mentioned already.

2. What’s the Downside?

At graduation, I happened to be seated next to the mother of one of the American graduating seniors. The family had lived in London for 14 years before moving back to the U.S. We marveled at the great opportunity that Richmond was for our kids. We wondered why everyone didn’t do it.

But surely there is a downside? Frankly, I am not sure that there is. Perhaps surprisingly, the cost is actually not the downside. Tuition this coming year for U.S. students is $38,000?not as cheap as your state’s public university for sure, but not as expensive as many private colleges in the U.S. And, yes, the kids do have to travel back and forth to London, which isn’t cheap. However, the kids tend to leave only at the semester break because they enjoy visiting the homes of their classmates in Europe for shorter breaks. So, it really amounts to two round trips per year.

I understand that, for some parents, the real downside is having their children so far away from home that they really can’t see them more than during the month-long semester breaks and summer vacations. There really is no argument to make if that is your concern, parents. However, I will tell you that you are likely to miss your children a lot more than they will miss you. I am sure that some have a bit of homesickness at the beginning, but there is so much new to see and do that I don’t believe it lasts very long. And at smaller colleges, like Richmond, there is a bit of a family atmosphere anyway, with small classes and many opportunities to build close relationships both with the other students and with the professors.

3. The Master’s Degrees

The real “deal” at Richmond, by the way, is the M.A. program, which costs about $15,500 (the M.B.A. is a little bit pricier) and is completed in just one full calendar year (that is, two academic semesters and a summer). That’s compared to the two years (or four academic semesters) you would have to pay for at a far higher annual price at many private U.S. colleges.

As I mentioned in a Facebook Live chat I did with my daughter when she was home in New York City doing her internship last summer, I thought that her M.A. program in Visual Arts Management and Curating was excellent. She worked hard and graduated “with Distinction,” but that is thanks to the outstanding professors she had and how committed they were to the students. My daughter and her classmates traveled to many museums and galleries for classes, they met with working professionals in London in and outside of classes, and they had easy access to their professors.

So, if you have an older child graduating from college next year, consider whether a good and reasonably priced graduate program in London–or somewhere else outside the U.S–might be the way to go.

4. Next Week

Next week, we will turn our college spotlight on colleges north of the border–that is, colleges in Canada, which are becoming more attractive to U.S. students. We’ll tell you why, so stay tuned.

Find our books on Amazon!

Ask your questions or share your feedback by…

  • Leaving a comment below on the show notes for this episode
  • Calling us at (516) 900-6922 to record a question on our USACollegeChat voicemail if you want us to answer your question live on our podcast

Connect with us through…

 

Episode 75: Study Abroad, the New Deal Breaker

Listen to the episode in the player, download it here, or subscribe on Google Play Music, iTunes,Stitcher, or TuneIn.

Our episode today is a direct result of my recent trip to London to pick up my daughter and bring her home. What that means really is that she needed someone to bring suitcases that she could fill up with her possessions after one year of graduate study in London and someone to help her get them all on the airplane to fly back here to New York City. I was that person.

Study Abroad the New Deal Breaker on USACollegeChat podcast

Those of you who have been listening to our podcast since the beginning are well aware of my strong belief in the value of studying abroad—“abroad” meaning studying outside the U.S.—for college students. All three of my children have done it, and all three have benefitted enormously from it. All three did it both at the undergraduate level and at the graduate level, so I am walking the walk and not just talking the talk, as they say.

This time, I had the pleasure of attending my daughter’s oral presentation of her master’s degree thesis proposal (the thesis will be written this summer) at Richmond, the American International University in London. Again, if you have been listening or if you read our book, you already know that one of my sons earned his undergraduate degree at Richmond. I loved it then, and I love it now. Richmond is an interesting university because it is jointly accredited in the U.S. and the U.K. Its undergraduate programs are in Richmond-upon-Thames, a beautiful hamlet just outside London, and its graduate programs are in Kensington, one of London’s loveliest neighborhoods. Polly’s master’€™s degree program area was small–just six full-time students, studying Visual Arts Management and Curating. There were three students from the U.S., one from South Korea, one from Russia, and one from Wales.

Polly’€™s Richmond professors were from England, Ireland, and Canada. They were so smart (as anyone could tell by the questions they asked the students after their presentations)—and yet so personable and so invested in each of their students. My heartfelt thanks to Oonagh Murphy (convenor of the Visual Arts Management and Curating programme), Nicola Mann, Tom Flynn, and Kate Mattocks–an impressive group. Hats off to Robert Wallis, Associate Dean of M.A. Programmes, for his leadership and support. The student-to-student bonds and the student-to-professor relationships were extraordinary and bridged all of the international boundaries that they crossed. I can’€™t imagine that Polly could have had a better experience anywhere–€”but to have had it in London just made it that much better.

Even though Polly had already learned to live abroad as an undergraduate student in a semester program in Florence (also operated by Richmond, by the way, that brought together students from all over the U.S.), she and her classmates in her undergraduate program were more tightly supervised, both academically and personally. As a parent, I was thrilled by that. Now, as a graduate student, she was on her own, navigating both academics and everyday life in a foreign city. But she was ready for it and learned from it. She will never be the same–€”in a good way.

All this got me thinking about what we have said in the past about study abroad options and what we should say now about them. So, here we go.

1. Study Abroad: The Statistics

Let’s start with a look at some statistics, which I have to admit I was totally unaware of. They come to you from NAFSA: Association of International Educators (formerly called the National Association of Foreign Study Advisers, hence the acronym NAFSA). Two years ago, during the 2013–2014 academic year, just over 300,000 U.S. college students studied abroad for college credit–€”that is, not quite 1.5 percent of all U.S. college students. That is a tiny, tiny percentage of our U.S. college students.

When we look at the racial and ethnic backgrounds of these 300,000 or so students, we see that white students are way overrepresented and black and Latino students are way underrepresented–€”and that is too bad. Here are the details (these are the most recent data from the Institute of International Education’€™s Open Doors Report and the U.S. Department of Education’s National Center for Education Statistics):

  • U.S. college enrollment is about 59 percent white, but study abroad enrollment is about 74 percent white.
  • U.S. college enrollment is about 16 percent Hispanic/Latino, but study abroad enrollment is only about 8 percent Hispanic/Latino.
  • U.S. college enrollment is about 15 percent black, but study abroad enrollment is only about 6 percent black.

I am wondering whether the underrepresentation of black and Hispanic/Latino students is partly because parents believe that study abroad is even more expensive than study at home in the U.S. As a matter of fact, that is not always true. But more about that later.

Let’€™s also take a look at where our U.S. students study abroad, and these numbers have remained remarkably stable since at least 2009. About 53 percent of our U.S. college students studied abroad in Europe, with almost 40 percent studying in just four countries: the U.K., Italy, Spain, and France. About 16 percent studied in Latin America, about 12 percent in Asia, and no more than about 4 percent in any other region of the world.

Interestingly, ValuePenguin, a research firm, did a study to determine how expensive it is for college students to live in the 48 countries that U.S. students most often study in. Written up in an article in Travel + Leisure magazine, the study looked at the cost of rent and utilities, flights, groceries, nightlife/dining out, clothes, recreation, local transportation, cell phone plans, and a student visa. The study produced two lists of 24 countries each: the most expensive and the least expensive. As it turns out, no European countries (where most U.S. students study) are on the least expensive list. Even worse, six of the top 10 most expensive countries are in Europe. Latin American countries are a better bet, if you are trying to watch costs. You can find the whole ranked list in the Travel + Leisure article. Just in case you are interested, the most expensive country to study in is Singapore, and the least expensive is Mexico.

2. The Money

But let’s look at money a different way, for a minute. First, let me say that I haven’€™t done an exhaustive study of what foreign study costs, as ValuePenguin did. But what I can offer is some anecdotal evidence of foreign study costs from my own experience.

When Polly spent her junior year fall semester in Florence in the program that was operated by Richmond, I can tell you that it was cheaper to send her there than to send her downtown to Fordham. Now, that doesn’€™t mean it was cheap. It certainly wasn’€™t. It was just relatively cheap compared to her private New York City university. So, if parents are thinking that it is always more expensive to go abroad than stay home, I can say that is not true–€”at least, not necessarily true if your child is going to a private college in the U.S.

Let’€™s fast forward to graduate school. Some of your children will undoubtedly end up there in the next few years. All three of my children earned their master’s degrees abroad–€”two from universities in the U.K. and one from an American university with its own fantastic campus in Spain. All three attracted students from all over the world. All three master’€™s degree programs were small, with excellent faculty-to-student ratios. The interesting thing about the U.K. programs was that each one was just one calendar year of study–September to September. Both had two semesters of coursework plus a summer for an internship and thesis or a final major project. The American university did a very similar thing–€”perhaps following European custom.

Not only was tuition lower in the European universities than it would have been in a private U.S. university, but the programs were just one year instead of what might well have been two years in the U.S. So, total tuition and living costs ended up being far lower in the U.K. At least in some cases, though I am not claiming in all cases, European graduate education turns out to be a way to save real money.

3. A Deal Breaker?

But enough about facts and figures. Let’€™s go back to something that Marie and I wrote about in our book last fall–€”How To Find the Right College: A Workbook for Parents of High School Students (available from amazon.com). We wrote about the notion of deal breakers–€”that is, things that are so important that you would not let your child apply to a college that didn’€™t have them or things that are so important that your child would not agree to apply to a college that didn’€™t have them. You might have your deal breakers, and your child might have others.

We talked about nine deal breakers in the book, and we have done episodes on all of them. Now, I am wishing that we had written about a tenth deal breaker, and that is whether a college you are considering for your child has its own study abroad program or at least easy access to a study abroad program (perhaps a joint one in a consortium of other colleges). If I have managed to convince any of you listeners about the values of foreign study–€”in students’€™ academic growth, personal growth, and social growth–€”the availability of such a program might well make your deal breakers list. It should have made mine if I had known more at the time.

While it is always possible to do a semester abroad even if a college does not have its own program or easy access to one, that takes a lot of effort from the student, including dealing with faculty and administrators who might not think that leaving their own college for another institution abroad is worth it. Having a program in place at your child’€™s college makes things a lot smoother.

We talked often about study abroad programs in our virtual nationwide tour some months ago. At the time, we were amazed at the variety of programs that existed and at the attractiveness of those programs. We noted colleges that encouraged–”even required–their students to study abroad and colleges where high percentages of students did study abroad. And we applauded them. So, what do you think? Is this a new deal breaker for you or your child?

Want to hear from a parent and a student about studying abroad?

  • Watch our Facebook video featuring Regina and her daughter discussing her study abroad experiences below.

Ask your questions or share your feedback by…

  • Leaving a comment here on the show notes for this episode
  • Calling us at (516) 900-6922 to record a question on our USACollegeChat voicemail if you want us to answer your question live on our podcast

Connect with us through…

Episode 44: College Study Abroad—One More Time

We are taking a one-week break from our virtual tour of colleges across the U.S. to reflect on the notion of study abroad opportunities for U.S. college students. 

Listen to the episode in the player, download it here, or subscribe on iTunes, Stitcher, or TuneIn.

We are doing this because I just returned from London, where I was taking my daughter to graduate school, and I found that London seemed full of students from all over the world.  Now, we know that about 70 percent of high school students stay in their home state for college.  The virtual tour of U.S. colleges that we have been taking with you over the past four months was designed to take you outside your geographical comfort zone and get you to look at other regions of the U.S. as possible locations for a college for your teenager.  College study abroad is going to take many of you way outside your geographical comfort zone.  But we think it is a trip worth taking.

Episode 44: College Study Abroad—One More Time on NYCollegeChat podcast. Listen at http://usacollegechat.org/44The practice of sending college students to study abroad for at least part of their undergraduate degree coursework has exploded over the past several decades.  Now a number of colleges make foreign study a regular part of college life.  In fact, we have talked about colleges in other episodes where the vast majority of students study abroad for at least a semester as well as colleges where students are required to study abroad.  Those of you who have been listening to our virtual tour might remember, for example, our discussion of Centre College in Kentucky, one of the Colleges That Change Lives (see the website or book of the same name for further information).  At Centre College, about 85 percent of students study abroad at least once and about 25 percent at least twice. 

We have talked in past episodes and in our book—How To Find the Right College, now available at amazon.com—about all of the practical and philosophical reasons for sending U.S. students to study in foreign countries.  We have also talked about the everyday difficulties (like medical problems) and the crazy amount of paperwork that has to be done to secure student visas, and we aren’t going to repeat all of that now. 

Part-Time Study Abroad

So, a part-time short study abroad program could be the way to get started for your teenager.  It could be for a summer or for a semester or even for a full school year. 

As we have said before, a college might have its own study abroad program on its own campus in another country, or it might offer a program on the campus of a foreign partner university in another country.  Or a college might join a group of colleges that offer study abroad programs together in facilities in another country.  I have been intrigued by the colleges we have profiled on our virtual tour that have fabulous campuses abroad.

For example, take Saint Louis University in St. Louis, Missouri, but also in Madrid:  Saint Louis University, The American Jesuit University in Spain.  Starting as a simple study abroad program in the 1960s, the Madrid campus is now home to about 675 students, who are 50 percent American, 20 percent Spanish, and 30 percent from over 65 other countries.  It has a faculty of 115 members, and a student-to-faculty ratio of 11:1.  It offers complete degrees in business, art history, communication, economics, international studies, political science, psychology, and Spanish—and in English and history, with just one semester back at the Missouri campus.  Furthermore, students from the Missouri campus can come and take courses for a year or two that can count toward the Missouri campus’s almost 100 majors.  For many of the Madrid students, Saint Louis University is actually full-time, not part-time, study abroad.

If study abroad is something that you know your teenager is interested in or if this is something you are interested in for your teenager—and I hope you are—check out what study abroad options are available at colleges you are getting ready to put on your teenager’s list of colleges to apply to.  And check out how many students at those colleges study abroad; the figures are readily available on college websites in the “Study Abroad” or “Study Away” program descriptions.

And don’t forget to take a look at what the American Institute for Foreign Study (AIFS) has to offer.  Based in Stamford, Connecticut, AIFS operates a wide range of summer, semester-long, and year-long programs in over 20 countries on five continents.  (All three of my own children have done AIFS programs, with great success.)

In AIFS programs, students take college courses taught in English and receive college credits, which can be transferred back to the student’s own college.  If a student chooses to attend a program in a non-English-speaking country, then language courses are usually required.  For example, in just a one-semester program, which opens with an intensive full-time two-week language course before the semester starts and continues with regular language classes during the semester, students can earn a full year of foreign language credits, which many liberal arts students need to fulfill bachelor’s degree requirements. 

By the way, whatever financial aid students have at their home college can usually be used to cover the costs of attending a semester or two abroad, and AIFS has scholarships available for their programs as well.  We have found that it can actually be cheaper to spend a semester abroad through AIFS than to pay for tuition and living expenses at a private college in the U.S.  I will say that some colleges that have their own study abroad programs might prefer that students use them rather than go through AIFS, so that is also something to keep in mind. 

Full-Time Study Abroad

So, what if you have a teenager wants to go to a college that is located outside the U.S.—either because he or she just wants to study outside of the U.S. or because there is one certain college of particular interest to your child?  Of course, there are thousands of colleges available in many countries across the world—many of which have much longer and more remarkable histories than any college history we have recounted to you in our virtual tour of the U.S.  Admissions requirements, however, can be quite different from what U.S. colleges expect, partly because the systems of primary and secondary education in other countries are typically quite different from ours.  So here are two easier options to consider.

One great choice is Richmond, The American International University in London.  I have talked about Richmond on several occasions, partly because I know it so well.  My son did his undergraduate work there, and my daughter just started her master’s degree there last week.  Richmond is accredited in both the U.S. and the United Kingdom so that admissions (there is a U.S. admissions office in Boston) and everything else is vastly simplified.  As I have undoubtedly said before, Richmond    offers bachelor’s and master’s degree programs to students from over 100 countries.  It offers a lovely picture-postcard campus for freshmen and sophomores in Richmond-upon-Thames (a beautiful suburban location just a tube ride away from central London) and a group of buildings in the prestigious neighborhood of Kensington in London for juniors, seniors, and graduate students.  Richmond also has two outstanding study abroad centers in Rome and Florence, Italy, where both the curricula and the settings are unbeatable.  So both its locations and its students are truly international, but U.S. students have the comfort of taking classes in English.  By the way, Richmond also offers “study abroad” with partner universities in a variety of cities across the globe, so your U.S. student can study abroad abroad.  And, when you are in London, you realize quickly that British English is not really the same as American English, so studying in London really is studying abroad.  Incidentally, attending Richmond is no more expensive than attending a comparable private college in the U.S. (and tuition might actually be a little lower). 

Another interesting choice outside the U.S. is The American University of Paris (AUP), a small, but incredibly diverse, institution—as the brochure says, “1000 Students, 100 Nationalities.”  A liberal arts university founded in 1962, AUP is one of the oldest American higher education institutions in Europe.  So, it’s American, which might feel a lot more comfortable to American students than studying in a foreign university.  It offers bachelor’s degrees in a variety of arts and sciences, plus international business administration, and it offers master’s degrees in six fields.  Of course, studying in Paris allows students to take full advantage of the enormous number of cultural opportunities there outside of classes—the museums, the theaters, the historical sites, and the most beautiful urban setting in the world.  If I had it to do over again, I might well go there myself. 

When Marie and I attended the National Association for College Admission Counseling’s college fair in New York City last April, we spoke with Julie Sappington, an AUP admissions counselor and recruiter.  Julie offered the following audio pitch for AUP for NYCollegeChat. (Be sure to listen to it in our recorded episode.)

Graduate Study Abroad

Another choice is to have your teenager wait until graduate school to study abroad, assuming he or she is interested in graduate school eventually.  Some U.S. colleges operate graduate programs abroad, and there are thousands of graduate programs offered by foreign universities as well, of course.  At that time in their lives, students will likely be more mature, will have a better handle on what they want to do for a career, will be more focused on making the best use of their time abroad, and might be able to assume more of the cost themselves. 

I love the idea of graduate study abroad—so much so that all three of my children did their master’s degree study abroad:  Jimmy at Berklee College of Music, an American university with its own graduate campus in drop-dead gorgeous Valencia, Spain; Bobby at the University of East Anglia, a British university he attended after graduating from Richmond; and Polly, of course, who just started at Richmond.  Those were all great decisions.

But I have to say that all of them also studied abroad as undergraduates:  Jimmy in a summer program at the University of Limerick in Ireland through AIFS, Bobby full time at Richmond, and Polly for a semester in Florence through AIFS and Richmond.  I think that international experience as undergraduates made a remarkable difference in all of them—both personally and academically—and I have no doubt that it contributed to their willingness to study abroad full time as graduate students. 

So, here is my two cents’ worth of advice:  Don’t wait.  Help your teenager see the value of studying in another country and being immersed in another culture, hopefully with students from around the world.  Studying abroad is not just for rich kids, as I imagine it once was some decades ago.  Most students have student loans and scholarships, just as they do in the U.S., and most are on pretty tight budgets while they are abroad.  Parents:  Figure out a way to pay for it (it won’t be any harder than paying for everything else).  Because the experience will be, as they say, priceless.

Listen to the podcast to find out about…

 

Check out these higher education institutions and organizations we mention…

Outside of New York State

Learn more about these topics in previous episodes…

Connect with us through…

Ask your questions or share your feedback by…

  • Leaving a comment below

Listen to the episode in the player, download it here, or subscribe on iTunes, Stitcher, or TuneIn.

Download this episode!

 

Episode 36: Colleges in the Plains Region—Part II

In last week’s episode, we continued our virtual tour of colleges by looking at the seven states of the Plains region: Kansas, Nebraska, South Dakota, North Dakota, Missouri, Iowa, and Minnesota. We talked about public universities—both the flagship state public universities and other public universities in those states. Today, we will continue our tour of the Plains states by focusing on private higher education institutions.

We are going to check out a couple of national—well, really, international universities—as well as a handful of small liberal arts colleges.

A virtual audio tour of private #colleges in the Plains Regions on @NYCollegeChat #podcast

As we say in every one of these episodes, we want to make it clear that no college has asked us or paid us anything to name it. These are entirely our own choices.

And to repeat: Because enrollment figures are not necessarily comparable as reported by various colleges, you should use the figures we provide here just as an approximation of the actual campus enrollment, but one that is good enough to help you understand whether the student body is the right size for your child—roughly, small, medium, or large.

1. Private Universities

Let’s start with a university that ranks in the very top tier of almost everyone’s list: Washington University in St. Louis (known fondly as WashU). Yes, it is in St. Louis, Missouri—no connection to the state of Washington or to Washington, D.C. With about 6,500 undergraduates, 6,500 graduate and professional students, and another 1,000 nontraditional evening and weekend students, WashU describes itself as a medium-sized university. I mention the nontraditional evening and weekend enrollment because, interestingly enough, WashU was founded in 1853 as an evening program especially designed for the many newcomers who had been flooding the relatively new state and who needed industrial training and basic education courses. Its students are drawn from 50 states and more than 100 foreign countries, with only about 10 percent coming from Missouri; it is indeed an international university. While I believe that an undergraduate student body of 6,500 will still feel rather large to an incoming freshman, WashU claims to have a student-to-faculty ratio of an astoundingly low 8:1. I believe that is the lowest I have seen, including from small liberal arts colleges, and I imagine that is one thing that helps freshmen feel engaged quickly.

Situated on a hilltop, the campus was laid out in 1895 by Frederick Law Olmsted, landscape architect extraordinaire, who also happened to design two little parks we have in New York City—Central Park in Manhattan and Prospect Park in Brooklyn. Despite this beautiful setting, 40 percent of WashU students still study abroad.

WashU offers undergraduates a choice of about 90 fields of study, spread out over colleges/schools of arts and sciences, business, engineering, art, and architecture. It also has graduate schools of law, medicine, arts and sciences, and social work and public heath. Like all medium-sized and large universities we have seen, WashU fields a lot of varsity sports teams—nine men’s and 10 women’s teams, to be exact— and offers 37 club sports. A surprisingly high 75 percent of students participate in single-sex and coeducational intramural sports. And, with about 370 student organizations, WashU students can be kept quite busy.

Let us just note that the tuition at WashU is a staggeringly high $47,000 per year, but that is unfortunately in keeping with the best private universities in the U.S. While the WashU website indicates that the University will work with families to make satisfactory financial arrangements and while children of lower-income families are awarded grants that do not have to be repaid, let’s admit that the tuition sounds like a lot of money.

Without leaving Missouri, let’s look at a Catholic university of about the same size as WashU, and that is Saint Louis University, in St. Louis. It is a Jesuit university founded in 1818—the first university west of the Mississippi River. It is one of 28 Jesuit universities in the U.S. We spoke about Jesuit institutions in an early episode of NYCollegeChat; as we said then, they have excellent academic reputations and include colleges like Georgetown University, Boston College, Fordham University, and the College of the Holy Cross. The Jesuit vision of education is a student who excels academically, serves others, and seeks social justice relentlessly. Saint Louis University prides itself on educating the whole person—“mind, body, heart and spirit” (quoted from the website). As evidence of the Jesuit commitment to serving others, Saint Louis students, faculty, and staff contribute one million volunteer service hours each year, and service learning is integrated into quite a few academic courses.

Saint Louis offers about 100 undergraduate majors across undergraduate schools/colleges of arts and sciences, public health and social justice, business, education and public service, health sciences, nursing, social work, and engineering, aviation, and technology. It also offers undergraduate training leading to the priesthood and graduate schools of law and medicine, among other fields. Like other universities, it offers varsity sports teams— seven men’s and nine women’s teams—and more than 150 student organizations, plus fraternities and sororities. Its price tag is hefty at about $39,000 in tuition per year, but the website claims that 97 percent of first-time freshmen get financial aid.

One super-attractive feature of Saint Louis University is its own campus in Madrid, which serves about 675 undergraduate and graduate students. Just half are from the U.S. Opened in 1967 and recently renovated, undergraduates can study in 11 business and liberal arts degree fields. Courses are taught in English, with some selected courses taught in Spanish. Saint Louis undergraduates can study in Madrid for a semester or for their entire four years, depending on their majors.

2. Private Liberal Arts Colleges

Let’s start with two small liberal arts colleges in Minnesota: Carleton College and Macalester College. Carleton is located in Northfield, about 40 miles south of the Twin Cities of Minneapolis and St. Paul, home to the University of Minnesota and other colleges. Founded in 1866 by the General Conference of Congregational Churches, it has no religious affiliation today.

Carleton is a classic liberal arts college (that is, undergraduate education only), offering 37 majors in the arts and sciences and 15 mostly interdisciplinary concentrations. It enrolls about 2,000 students, drawn nationally and internationally. While more students come from Minnesota than any other state, with California not far behind, both New York and Illinois send about half the number of those leading states to Carleton. Entering freshmen have very high SAT and ACT scores, and about 75 percent of them graduated in the top 10 percent of their high school classes. About 25 percent identify as “people of color.”

Freshmen are required to live on campus, and about 90 percent stay on campus, contributing to the close-knit community feel and an unusually close engagement with professors, both in and out of classes. The student-to-faculty ratio is an unusually low 9:1, meaning that professors spend a lot of time getting to know students. About 98 percent of Carleton seniors say that they were happy with the quality of instruction in their classes. The four-year graduation rate is an enviably high 90 percent (the national average is about 38 percent). Furthermore, over 80 percent of Carleton graduates go on to graduate or professional school within 10 years.

Carleton operates on a trimester schedule of three 10-week terms, with students taking three courses at a time, rather than the typical four or five. This schedule allows for the in-depth thinking Carleton prides itself on having students do in their courses. More than 70 percent of students study abroad during their four years.

Though much smaller than the private and public universities we have been looking at, Carleton still fields nine men’s and nine women’s varsity sports teams and offers more than 50 student-organized club sports and intramurals. About 90 percent of all Carleton students participate in some sport at some level. Carleton’s Cowling Arboretum, which provides trails for walkers, runners, bicyclists, and cross-country skiers, was named one of the top 10 places to run by Runner’s World magazine. Carleton also has 250 student organizations.

You can imagine that all this comes at a price, and that price is $48,000 in tuition each year. Carleton does say that it is “committed to meeting 100 percent of financial aid for all admitted students, all four years” (quoted from the website). Interestingly, about 80 percent of students have jobs on campus.

Macalester College is similar to Carleton in many ways. Both colleges are on many lists of the top 25 liberal arts colleges in the U.S., with Carleton usually ranking in the top 10. Macalester is located in a residential area of St. Paul, so its students can take advantage of everything the Twin Cities have to offer. Founded in 1874 by Rev. Edward Neill, it is Presbyterian affiliated, but nonsectarian. Neill was a missionary to the Minnesota territory, who later served as the first president of the University of Minnesota. But he was concerned about educating future leaders and believed that the best way to do that was in a small private college. And so Macalester was born, with a donation from a Philadelphia philanthropist.

Like Carleton, Macalester is a classic liberal arts college, offering 38 majors in the arts and sciences. It also enrolls just over 2,000 students, drawn nationally and internationally. Similar to Carleton, about 70 percent of incoming freshmen graduated in the top 10 percent of their high school classes. Like Carleton, about 25 percent of students identify as students of color.

The student-to-faculty ratio is also low at 10:1, meaning that students have a chance to get to know their professors well. Similar to Carleton, the four-year graduation rate is an enviably high 85 percent, and about 65 percent of Macalester graduates go on to graduate or professional school within five years.

About 60 percent of Macalester students study abroad during their four years, and about 75 percent have internships. A whopping 95 percent do volunteer work in the Twin Cities at some point, with about half of Macalester students volunteering in any given semester.

Similar to Carleton, Macalester fields nine men’s and 10 women’s varsity sports teams. About half of Macalester students participate in intramural sports. It also has more than 90 student organizations.

Unfortunately, the price is also comparable at about $49,000 in tuition each year. But like Carleton, Macalester says that it will meet 100 percent of demonstrated financial need of admitted students, making Macalester and Carleton two of 70 U.S. colleges that will do that.

A third college that also typically ranks in the top 25 national private liberal arts colleges on all kinds of lists is Grinnell College in Grinnell in the “rolling farmland” of central Iowa. Founded in 1846, Grinnell is another college with Congregational Church roots.

A bit smaller than Carleton and Macalester, Grinnell has an enrollment of about 1,600 students, drawn nationally and internationally, again with about 25 percent students of color.

Grinnell offers 26 arts and sciences majors and 11 interdisciplinary concentrations and also has a very favorable student-to-teacher ratio of 9:1. Here is an explanation of Grinnell’s unique Individually Advised Curriculum:

Every first-year student at Grinnell enrolls in the First-Year Tutorial, a small group of students [limited to 12] working with a faculty member to study a subject of interest to both students and tutor. The tutor also is the academic adviser for each student in the group, so that teaching and learning are closely linked with the planning of programs of study. In teaching, the tutor discovers the aptitudes and interests of the students, who in turn receive academic advice, not from an infrequently consulted stranger, but from a teacher who sees them several times each week. In planning a program of study, the student and the tutor balance the cultivation of existing interests with the discovery of new ones. An entering student should regard the first year as a time for gaining breadth in the arts and sciences, confidence in exploring a variety of disciplines, and a more mature understanding of the place of each of these in liberal education as a whole. (quoted from the website)

Grinnell does expect students to become proficient in written English by taking at least one appropriate course, to develop knowledge of mathematics and/or a foreign language, and to take courses in these three areas: humanities, science, and social studies. So, there are some distribution requirements, but extreme freedom in what exactly to take. When a student finally chooses a major, his or her academic advisor will be assigned from that subject field.

In addition, Grinnell is a strong proponent of independent study for its students—that is, “guided readings, independent projects, mentored summer research, and course-linked projects that add credits to an existing course” (quoted from the website).

Abut 60 percent of Grinnell students spend time studying abroad and, according to the website, “Grinnell is among the leaders in sending graduates to the Peace Corps and supports its own Grinnell Corps — a yearlong postgraduate service opportunity in Asia, Africa, and North America — underscoring the College’s strong commitment to social responsibility and action.”

Grinnell offers more than 200 student organizations and nine men’s and nine women’s varsity sports teams. To help students develop skills of getting along with each other as a community, Grinnell’s residence halls are self-governed by the students.

As with the other small liberal arts college we have looked at, tuition at Grinnell is a high $45,000 per year.

3. Colleges That Change Lives

As we have said in several earlier episodes, Colleges That Change Lives is a nonprofit organization that was founded after the publication of the book Colleges That Change Lives, by Loren Pope, a retired New York Times education editor. There are now 44 colleges and universities profiled in the book and on the organization’s website. Those that are included are not necessarily famous institutions. Most are smaller colleges and universities that have proved to be successful at developing students both personally and academically so that they can succeed in life after their undergraduate college years.

Two of the 44 institutions profiled are located in the Plains states. You should read about them in the book or on the website to learn more about both of them. They are St. Olaf College in Northfield, Minnesota (also the home of Carleton College), with about 3,000 students; and Cornell College in Mount Vernon, Iowa, with just about 1,100 students. Interestingly, Cornell College (not to be confused with Cornell University in Ithaca, New York) uses the same fascinating one-at-a-time course schedule that Colorado College uses, as we discussed in Episode 34.

Because these Colleges That Change Lives institutions are relatively small and thus are not particularly well known outside of their geographic region, it is my feeling that out-of-state students with a decent high school record might have a good chance of being accepted.

Listen to the podcast to find out about…

  • How to make study abroad easy
  • Why student-to-teacher ratio might matter
  • What “100 percent of demonstrated financial need” really means

Check out these higher education institutions and organizations we mention…

In New York State

Outside of New York State

Learn more about these topics in previous episodes…

Connect with us through…

Ask your questions or share your feedback by…

  • Leaving a comment below

Episode 8: The World Abroad

We’re finishing our series on understanding the world of college this week by exploring study abroad and exchange programs.
Listen to the podcast to find out about…
Exchange semesters at historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs) and Hispanic-serving institutions (HSIs)
Why it is not really more expensive to study abroad
Why Richmond, the American International University in London is unique
Episode show notes are available at http://usacollegechat.org/8

Connect with us through…
Subscribing to NYCollegeChat on iTunes, Spreaker, Stitcher, or TuneIn!
Following us on Twitter @NYCollegeChat
Reviewing parent materials we have available at Policy Studies in Education http://policystudies.org/parents
Inquiring about our consulting services if you need individualized help
Following us on Facebook http://www.facebook.com/NYCollegeChat

Ask your questions or share your feedback by…
Calling our hotline at 516-900-NYCC
Emailing us at paul@policystudies.org to ask a question if you want us to answer it privately

We’re finishing our series on understanding the world of college this week by exploring study abroad and exchange programs.

NYCollegeChat is now available on iTunes, Spreaker, Stitcher, and TuneIn!

NYCollegeChat Episode 8: The World Abroad

1. Part-Time Study Abroad

If a student is interested in exploring the culture of another country, a short study abroad program is a perfect opportunity. It could be for a summer or for a semester or for a year.

When exploring colleges, look to see what study abroad options they have. A college might have its own study abroad program, on its own campus in another country or on the campus of a partner university in another country. Students typically go for one or both semesters during their junior year and take a full course load while there so they do not get behind in their progress toward graduation.

Or check out the American Institute for Foreign Study (AIFS), based in Stamford, Connecticut. AIFS operates a wide range of summer, semester-long, and year-long programs around the world for college students. Some summer programs are as short as three weeks—time enough to learn a lot, but not enough time to get homesick. (AIFS also offers wonderful summer programs for high school students, which we will talk about in a later episode.) In AIFS college programs, students take college courses taught in English and receive college credits, which can be transferred back to the student’s own college. If a student chooses to attend a program in a non-English-speaking country, then language courses are usually required. In just one semester, students can sometimes earn a full year of foreign language credit, which many liberal arts students need to fulfill bachelor’s degree requirements.

By the way, whatever financial aid students have can usually be used to cover the costs of attending a semester or two abroad, and AIFS has scholarships available for their programs as well.

2. Going to a Foreign College

So, a student wants to go to college outside the U.S. Of course, there are thousands of colleges available in many countries across the world. Admissions requirements, however, can be quite different from what U.S. colleges expect. And full-time study abroad means a lot of “red tape” for families—including complicated student visa applications at the U.S. consulates of foreign countries. (This is also true for many semester-long study abroad programs, though some U.S. colleges and AIFS help families handle that paperwork.) At foreign colleges, classes will not be taught in English unless, of course, the college is in an English-speaking country.

One unique choice for full-time study abroad is Richmond, the American International University in London. Richmond is accredited in both the U.S. and the United Kingdom so that admissions and potential transfer of credits back to U.S. colleges are simplified. Richmond offers bachelor’s and master’s degree programs to students from over 100 countries. While it offers a beautiful campus in Richmond for freshmen and sophomores and a location in London for juniors, seniors, and graduate students, it also has two outstanding study abroad centers in Rome and Florence, Italy. Truly international!

Listen to the podcast to find out about…

Check out these higher education institutions and programs we mention…

In New York State

Outside of New York State

Connect with us through…

Ask your questions or share your feedback by…